1. Submissions. Articles should be submitted as e-mail attachments to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The file name should contain author’s name and the year.

Example: Smith 2017.doc

2. General style

Literature of the Americas  follows Webster’s Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary for spelling, and strict Library of Congress transliteration of Russian.

3. Specific style points

3.1. Opener: Your name and the title of your paper should be printed in Times New Roman, font size 14, centered. The title should be short and descriptive of the content. Below is the abstract (200-250 words), keywords (5-10), your full name, position, academic degree, affiliation, country, e-mail address (font size 12).

Example:

Ivan DELAZARI

A MEDIUM OF FICTION: WILLIAM H. GASS (1924–2017)

Abstract: The article is a brief overview of the literary oeuvre and aesthetic views of William H. Gass, who passed away in December 2017. One of the brightest American prose writers of the 1960–1970s, prolifically active till very recently, Gass is virtually unknown to readers of Russian and insufficiently attended to by the US academia. I derive his relative invisibility from the fact that too much is lost in, and even prior to, translation (whether interlingual or intralingual, in Roman Jakobson’s terms) of his texts and from Gass’s self-conscious stance as an unrepentant formalist. Gass gave priority to linguistic constructions over content-centered narrations/descriptions not only in theory but also in practice, in fictions as well as in essays. Despite his repute as a radical innovator, Gass held to rather conservative aesthetic beliefs, which, considering their well-articulated nature, do not need the extra medium of academic criticism for reaching out to Gass’s future audiences.

 

Keywords: William H. Gass, 20th-century American fiction, American essay, formalist criticism, formalist aesthetics, American postmodern fiction

© 2018 Ivan Delazari (PhD, part-time lecturer, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong,This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

3.2. Text: The text should be printed in Microsoft Word, format А4, margins 25 mm at all sides, font Times New Roman, font size – 12, line spacing 1,5, indentation (new paragraph) 1,25, portrait orientation without hyphens. Foreign words should be translated whenever possible. Those that must remain in a foreign language should be in italics and transliterated according to the Library of Congress system of translation. Numbers one to ten should be spelled out; those 11 and over must be in numerals. Exceptions: If the number is the first word in the sentence, it should be written out, regardless of size (Eight hundred men went to the army). Dates: LoA uses day month year (1 October 2003).

3.3. Footnotes and References:

Please include publishers in the notes!

First reference to books, articles, etc.: always give the surname, initials, title, place, publisher, date, and page number cited. Later references should be shortened.

Please do not use op. cit.!  Use short titles instead. Ibid.  may be used (and is never italicized), but avoid “op. cit.”

Please do not use idem.! Repeat the author’s or editor’s name instead of using “idem.”

Example (first reference): Marx, K. The Communist Manifesto, trans. L.Sally. New York: Workers’ Press, 1987: 89.

Example (second reference): Marx, K. Communist Manifesto: 45.

Edited volumes and collections of essays.
If an edited volume / collection of essays is cited without reference to a particular item therein, then the proper order of citation should be: Title, ed(s). Editor(s), etc.

Example (first reference): Slave Narratives in American Literary History, eds. Peter H. Cowper. John P. Smith. New York: Academic Press, 2010: 115.

Or:

Cowper, P.H.,  Smith J.P., eds. Slave Narratives in American Literary History. New York: Academic Press, 2010: 115.

Example (second reference): Slave Narratives in American Literary History: 115.

Or:

Cowper, P.H.,  Smith J.P., eds. Slave Narratives in American Literary History: 115.

If an article in a collection / edited volume is cited, then the order should be: Article Author, “Article Title,” in Collection Title, ed(s). Editor(s), etc.

Example (first reference): Friedan,  W. “Conversion Narratives and Success Stories,” in Slave Narratives in American Literary History, eds. John P. Smith, Peter H. Cowper. New York: Academic Press, 2010: 115.

Example (second reference): Friedan,  W. “Conversion Narratives and Success Stories”: 115.

Archival materials. In references to archives, write out the full name of the archive at the first reference and thereafter cite it by the standard acronym. Please identify fonds and documents on first use, if possible.

Example (first reference): The Russian State Archive of Literature and Arts (RGALI) f. 1 (Maxim Gorky Papers), inv. 1, it. 336: 1 (M.Gorky’s Letter to V. Lenin, 12 October 1920).
Example (second reference): RGALI, f. 1, inv. 1, it. 336:. l.

Dissertations. For references to dissertations, please use the following style:

Example (first reference): White, J.P. “Ernest Hemingway’s Russian Translations, 1920-1930s.” PhD diss., University of Michigan, 2001: 33-34. 
Example (second reference): White, J.P. “Ernest Hemingway’s Russian Translations”: 77.

Journal article citation. Whenever possible, provide number (issue) and year / season / month / date of a journal article in addition to the volume. In first full citations to a journal article, please give volume and issue number after the title of the journal, parenthesis for the year / season / month / date, and a colon to set off the page numbers. If no issue number is available, please provide month or season instead.

Example (first reference): Cooper, F. “Conflict and Connection: Rethinking African American Novel of the 1900s.” African American Historical Review 99: 5 (Sept. 1997): 234–45.

Example (second reference): Cooper, F. “Conflict and Connection”: 235-6.

For periodicals that do not regularly provide volume numbers, such as Russian journals, you may put a “No.” preceded by a colon.

Example (first reference): Smirnov, V.A. “On Russian-American Literary Contacts after 1960s.” Moscow State University Bulletin 6 (2009): 7–20.
Example (second reference): Smirnov, V.A. “On Russian-American Literary Contacts after 1960s”: 17.

Newspaper citations. Please include author’s name, article title and, whenever possible, page numbers. For online references, include the website address (see below).

Online references. Please include author’s name, article / book title,  place, publisher, date, and page number(s) whenever possible before the website address.

Example (first reference) Kellogg, M. “Harriet Beecher Stowe and the Power of Faith.” Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan,   2003. Online at  http://utc.iath.michigan.edu /essays/2003/kell0gg.html

Example (second reference) Kellogg, M. “Harriet Beecher Stowe and the Power of Faith.”

Page numbers. Please give page numbers after a colon without “p.” or “pp.” Page number series. Series of page numbers should read as follows: 333–56, not 333–356. The exception applies to numbers under ten.

Names. Please provide initials after the surname using a comma.

Example: Lewis, C.S.

Publishers. As noted above, whenever possible provide publishers of all printed works on first citation of the work.